Cultural practices, political economy and social psychology in the similarity of practices in schools

I have been interested in cultural practices in teaching for a few years. So I was interested how this resonated with Steven Puttick’s recent article in School Leadership and Management , describing an ethnographic study of geography departments. I say I am interested in cultural practices, by this I mean that I make the assumption that withinContinue reading “Cultural practices, political economy and social psychology in the similarity of practices in schools”

The variation in teachers’ pay in large Multi Academy Trusts

Following my analysis in previous blogs of the variation in teachers’ pay in England, I now look at the difference between pay in the larger academy chains and Multi Academy Trusts (MATs). I used data from the National Statistics School workforce in England (November 2015) data again and identified which Trust schools were part of. I lookContinue reading “The variation in teachers’ pay in large Multi Academy Trusts”

Why do teachers get paid more in maintained schools? – part 2

I have completed some further analysis using the underlying data from the National Statistics School workforce in England (November 2015) data. I have looked at the differences in teachers’ pay in secondary schools between Local Authority (LA) maintained schools and academies. The question raised in my previous blog was: why do teachers get paid more inContinue reading “Why do teachers get paid more in maintained schools? – part 2”

Teachers’ pay in academies and LA maintained secondary schools

Based on the school workforce data for 2015, teachers get paid less working in secondary academies than they do working in LA maintained schools. The difference looks relatively small on the above chart. But the differences are not trivial as shown below: Looking at the difference between teachers’ pay in LA maintained secondary schools andContinue reading “Teachers’ pay in academies and LA maintained secondary schools”

The exploitation of teachers

In this series of blogs, I have shown that, as a result of the Education Reform Act 1988, the school system has effectively been privatised. This is not been a simple matter of withdrawing public funding from schools and allowing them to operate as independents within a free market. It is quite difficult to see thisContinue reading “The exploitation of teachers”

The College of Teaching: please don’t get the decorators in while the house is burning down

Congratulations to Dame Alison Peacock on her appointment as the first CEO of the College of Teaching. She has done an impressive job in championing assessment for learning in schools. Broadly I am in favour of the formation of professional bodies, I believe they have the potential to support and develop the professional esteem ofContinue reading “The College of Teaching: please don’t get the decorators in while the house is burning down”

A National Education Service is exactly what we need

Jeremy Corbyn has been floating the idea of a National Education Service since his Labour leadership campaign last year. The idea is breathtakingly simple and, in fact, blindingly obvious. The formation of a fully-funded, cradle-to-grave education service is the antithesis of the outsourced fragmented and anti-democratic reforms that have been creeping in since the 1970s.Continue reading “A National Education Service is exactly what we need”