It all kicked off on Twitter after I posted a journal article

Did I see that coming? Well, possibly, but I didn’t consciously set out to provoke such a Twitter response when I posted a link to my most recent academic publication on social media. Within a few hours of my article, New Right 2.0: Teacher populism on social media in England, being published by the BritishContinue reading “It all kicked off on Twitter after I posted a journal article”

Cultural practices, political economy and social psychology in the similarity of practices in schools

I have been interested in cultural practices in teaching for a few years. So I was interested how this resonated with Steven Puttick’s recent article in School Leadership and Management , describing an ethnographic study of geography departments. I say I am interested in cultural practices, by this I mean that I make the assumption that withinContinue reading “Cultural practices, political economy and social psychology in the similarity of practices in schools”

The progressive teaching tyranny myth

The argument goes that between 2004 and 2010 or thereabouts, there was a period of oppression in which teachers could not express their views. Or, if they wanted to pursue more traditional teaching approaches, there was a conspiracy by the educational establishment. An establishment consisting of university schools and faculties of education and local authorities backedContinue reading “The progressive teaching tyranny myth”

E D Hirsch’s visit to the UK and the neo-traditional teacher bloggers

I picked up on Hirsch’s visit to the UK, when I noticed excitement amongst a number of teacher bloggers on Twitter. Though, I don’t follow them directly, there was an overspill of retweet excitement, arousing some of the tweeters that I follow. I was aware of E D Hirsch from a general knowledge of education philosophy.Continue reading “E D Hirsch’s visit to the UK and the neo-traditional teacher bloggers”