Apparently there are too many PhD students

There have been some conversations in the University, I understand, that there are too many graduate students competing for too few academic jobs. There was some discussion also that we should reduce the number of graduate students. While the first statement might be true, I take issue with the second. Globally, there might be finiteContinue reading “Apparently there are too many PhD students”

Memory and emotion

In my research into teachers’ beliefs, I often to return the idea of episodic memory which Nespor (1987) takes from Abelson’s (1979) paper on the differences between knowledge and beliefs systems. Abelson suggests that information in knowledge systems is stored primarily in semantic networks, while belief systems are composed mainly of ‘episodically’-stored material derived fromContinue reading “Memory and emotion”

The use of drama in mathematics teacher education

In the final week of my teacher training course in 2001, there was an ‘options’ day, in which a range of workshops were available for trainee teachers to choose from. I decided to attend the forum theatre workshop. I self-consciously entered the room where the workshop was to be held. The workshop leader, as IContinue reading “The use of drama in mathematics teacher education”

That’s all very well but as a nation we just can’t afford it

Health and social care and education are now just unaffordable. There are too many old and sick people and too many people want to go to university. We can’t afford it. We have to do something different, they say. However, affordability at the level of a nation is widely misunderstood. The common metaphor for aContinue reading “That’s all very well but as a nation we just can’t afford it”

Workplace nursery provision: that’s a good thing right?

This post follows my previous on a proposed new nursery at the University of Cambridge. Following a campaign by staff in the Faculty of Education, the university balloted eligible staff (mainly academics and senior administrators) on the proposal. The Grace (Cambridge’s term for a proposal) was passed by 777 votes to 151. This means thatContinue reading “Workplace nursery provision: that’s a good thing right?”

Which side are you on? Self-interest versus solidarity in higher education union organising

Workplace nursery and childcare provision in the University of Cambridge falls well short of the demand for places. In recent decades in the UK nursery provision, which used to be run by councils, has been privatised. In the privatised system supply has not kept up with demand and employers have come under pressure to provideContinue reading “Which side are you on? Self-interest versus solidarity in higher education union organising”

A quick response to Lord Willetts on intergenerational equality (Resolution Foundation Report).

This is a quick response on Willetts’ talk in the Imagine 2027 series at Anglia Ruskin University last night. It is remarkable that the liberal wing of the Conservative is being forced to respond to the Labour Party’s progressive economic turn. Willetts’ considers that intergenerational equality is driven by birth rates, a largely Malthusian idea.Continue reading “A quick response to Lord Willetts on intergenerational equality (Resolution Foundation Report).”

Multiplication – the privilege of mathematical thinking

I love John Mason. It is always a pleasure to listen to him as he takes you with him through his exploration of mathematical thinking and learning: “sit there and close your eyes and imagine a number line…” He takes you on a journey of ideas, connections and new understandings of the relationships between conceptsContinue reading “Multiplication – the privilege of mathematical thinking”

Notes   [ + ]

1. http://notesfrombelow.org/issue/technology-and-the-worker